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Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)
blunders on foreign policy issues. the most recent one is a failure for america to retaliate in some meaningful or symbolic way on the death of an american ambassador in benghazi. the. >> the george bush administration would have piled in there, blown things to pieces and exacted terrible retribution. that's the american way for a long time. is that the right way? would that created, however awful the incident of a death involving a death of an ambassador is, is it right that president obama says let's get this in con tex, let's not attack. wars are extremely costly, both financially and with the human loss of life. >> you just went from 0 to 60. what i'm saying is in 2000, 1999-2000. after 9/11, one of the things we learned from osama bin laden, the jihad dis and jaul kwr strongly emboldened when there was no response to the bombing of the u.s.s. cole. there was no response that demonstrated you can not do this to americans. >> what would you have done in benghazi in the aftermath. >> i'm not a general -- >> hang on. you said i went from naught to 60, what's the middle ground betwee
towards foreign policy. and he's got a long list of foreign policy challenges in the second term. iranian nukes, how to deal with china. you know, a big sort of macro agenda in the obama administration has been to reduce our footprint in the middle east, become less entangled in that part of world and pivot towards engaging with east asia. and there's been a lot of work in the first term that has strengthened ties between the u.s. and many east asia countries. and obama officials talk about that as a big project of the second term. >> well, that is the perfect segue to my next guest. christiane amanpour, i don't think there's anyone better to talk about that. thank you all very much. reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, stayin
, looking at the president's second term, this focusing on foreign policy and and domestic issues. $17 trillion debt. he is facing a pullout from afghanistan and our role in the world. guest: it is interesting. leadership, what does that mean. if you go back on the eve of the world war, the number of foreignit was well under 100. the cold war has had an enormous transforming impact. dwight eisenhower cited all of this in his famous farewell address. i think there is a legitimate that is as old as the republic. washington's generation believed united states would be an asylum for the world's oppressed. bit embeddedit was a place to which victims of liberty. there was no sense that we were values on the rest of the world. host: this question, in case youwhy is the president having two swearing-in ceremonies? according to the inaugural committee, it has happened on six previous occasions. one today at the white house, one tomorrow at the capitol. guest: it was at the height of the war. his health was failing. they did away with most of the pomp, and had the ceremony on the grounds of the
. >> reporter: a number of presidents in their second terms have focused heavily on foreign policy and now that mr. obama has begun the job of replacing his outgoing secretaries of state and defense and the director of the cia, he'll have new faces to work with on his foreign policy team. joe johns, cnn, washington. >>> well, most people who come to washington for president obama's second inauguration are happy just to be able to witness history. >>> but some visitors want a little bit more, like monogrammed pillow cases and a 24-hour butler. who wouldn't want that? you can get it all for a price. we'll tell you about it when we come back. d. earn 1% cash back everywhere, every time. [ both ] 2% back on groceries. [ all ] 3% on gas. no hoops to jump through. i earn more cash back on the things i buy the most. [ woman ] it's as easy as... one! -two. -[ all ] three! [ male announcer ] the bankamericard cash rewards credit card. apply online or at a bank of america near you. are you flo? yes. is this the thing you gave my husband? well, yeah, yes. the "name your price" tool. you tell
on foreign policy and and domestic issues. the obama doctrine calls for ending america's wars, avoiding future ones and nationbuilding here at home. good ideas all. but, mishandled, they could signal a retreat from washington's global leadership. the president is facing a $16, $17 trillion debt. he is facing a pullout from afghanistan and our role in the world. guest: it is interesting. leadership, what does that mean. if you go back on the eve of the world war, the number of foreign military installations the united states had, compare that with today. it was well under 100. the cold war has had an enormous transforming impact. dwight eisenhower cited all of this in his famous farewell address. i think there is a legitimate debate to be had over what is -- that is as old as the republic. washington's generation believed united states would be an asylum for the world's oppressed. it was a place to which victims could come and enjoy the fruits of liberty. there was no sense that we were going to impose our vision or values on the rest of the world. host: this question, in case you missed
or foreign policy, the challenge is to overcome those obstacles that the political culture place in front of them. host: a call from cincinnati, ohio. caller: in a country where originally white people were not even citizens of this country and now we have a black president, i think we've come a long way. i feel that president obama has not done enough for either side. i think in the beginning it was an issue for him. now he's just like, i am going to be the president. but there are still people who cannot get past that. how does that affect his second term? i have to say, particularly republicans -- how do we get people over the issue of his race? guest: the sad reality is, there are some people that -- i do not think we want to make the mistake of exaggerating their numbers -- there are some people for whom they will never get over the issue of race. there are other people who quite sincerely, for reasons having nothing to do with race, believe that the president's agenda, in their estimation, is too fill-in-the-blank. the larger issue is how we create a political process in which any p
the neoconservative phase of the republican party as far as foreign policy goes. most republicans in the senate and the house, like the american people, are exhausted by 10, 11, 12 years of war. obviously, john mccain and lindsey graham are on the forefront and have shaped republican foreign policy for a few years. certainly john mccain has. he is in a shrinking minority. and it's shrinking very quickly. and i suspect you're going to see a return to the realism of colin powell of dr. brzezinski, of brent scowcroft, of george h.w. bush, of the republicans who helped us and democrats who helped us through that approach when the cold war. >> and this is the post-superpower era, where there has to be some pulling back, and david said it exactly right. >> i wouldn't say post-superpower. you're right, it's a new era. it's much more indirection in our application of power. the neocons are for direct use of power. this will have to be more indirect. >> and there may be surprises there, as always is the case. look at what happened with algeria and mali. >> dr. zbigniew brzezinski, dad, thanks for not wa
the speech, however, briep, was the absence of foreign policy. and the two really contentious appointments, or at least one is chuck hagel who is going to run the defense department. and the middle east is aflame again and now we're seeing it spread into africa in a way that is very hard to get a fix for what the model is dealing with it. these are failed states. we have tribalism again prevailing in africa and again in the middle east because islamic rage has not been distinguished. command and control of al qaeda they believe has been broken down, but as you saw in algeria in the past several days, this is going to be a continuing problem out there. that will go to the defense department, how it's run, how much money they have to spend, how they reorganized the response of that and secretary kerry would is going to pick up the baton from hillary clinton has to decide what's our relationship with egypt? how run by a muslim brotherhood. >> it's worth remarking on that because four years ago, as we all sat here, none of us expected every assumption you would make about the middle east for d
's more into foreign policy. >> eleanor, i'm curious how much you think approval ratings matter in a second term. you are not running for office again, but let's face it, popularity will also potentially equate with political capital. >> well, that's right. popularity equates with how much you can get done on capitol hill. i heard you say that bill clinton was one of two president who is rose in popularity second term nap's despite he was impeached. >> small detail. >> he was able to cash in on that because he pitted the american people against the congress. that's the opening this president has. i'm heartened by the fact they'll take organizing for america and make it organizing advocacy. i don't know why they didn't do that in the first term. i'm pretty optimistic about what he can get done. we've seen transformation in american society with the acceptance of gay marriage, transformation in the media. there could be transformations on capitol hill. if the president isn't able to accomplish, for example, his gun control agenda, who's going to look bad on that? that could have r
to one another must be equally as well. >> reporter: foreign policy was noticeably absent from his address though he harolded a decade of war, touting a recovering economy and acknowledged the lessons still ahead. >> the commitments we make to each other, these things do not sap our nation. they strengthen us. >> reporter: he gave mitt romney this line. >> they do not make us a nation of tears. ♪ la >> reporter: filling the air what patriotism, kelly clarkson and beyonce. ♪ the brave there was a poem and prayers. as he left the west front of the capitol, a nostalgic turned back toward the lincoln memorial. >> i want to take a look out one more time. >> now there were shades of the campaign that the president winning out, success can't mean that a few people are making it and a growing number are barely scratching by. the president acknowledging that bipartisan -- or the lack of bipartisanship here in washington but noted that everyone needs to work together for the good of the country. john? >> dan, that moment at the end of your piece where the president turned around and look
first four years, the person who probably had the most influence on my foreign policy was woman. the people who were in charge of moving forward my most important domestic initiative, health care, were women. the person in charge of our homeland security was woman. my two appointments to the supreme court were women. and 50% of my white house staff were women. so i think people should expect that that record will be built upon during the next four years. >> well, is the criticism fair against the president that's been thrown at him? falling short of his problem of being a champion for women. howard fineman is an msnbc political analyst. and "huffington post" has been facing obama. the road forward. and dee dee meyers. you were kind of a pioneeress in all this. i watch this. and maybe there's tokenism. which is maybe better than nothing. you wonder about the decision how they made it to make it look good. what's better to make it look bad by not doing it or to look good when you don't intend to have that person in there? >> the best is to put people in with the best authority and
of using it as an extension of their foreign policy. they have generally been fuelling and funding this for many decades. the algearians need to be confronted. if you are going to be taken seriously, you cannot support terrorist groups either inside or outside their borders. >> michael: and the about that they operated almost unilaterally in trying to free the hostages speaks to that they need to be confronted on that. the book is "leading from behind." richard miniter thanks for being here in "the war room." coming up it's the one time americans get to say to the british, see we can do pomp and circumstance just as well as you can. and republican leaders are on a secret retreat. we'll let you in on that secret. and later, the man, the myth, the legend that's right joe biden's exploits are pit to paper. it's a friday night in "the war room," and we're just getting started, so stick around. [ voice of dennis ] ...safe driving bonus check? every six months without an accident, allstate sends a check. ok. [ voice of dennis ] silence. are you in good hands? irene
. economy, obviously. you might have climate change. >> right. >> the foreign policy, the restructuring if you like of america's place in the world, taking on where barack obama has taken it so far. very interesting. perhaps leading from the back as he said in certain cases rather than from the front. i think the days of america having to be the global policeman should be over. what else do you see as priorities? >> immigration reform. the president feels strongly about we'll tackle this year. everyone out there understands our system is broken. and we need some fundamental restructuring of it. right thing to do. there's common sense agreement out in the states on how to do it. people putting politics aside. i think you will see the president in the second term work passionately across party lines on education to make the k-12 system the best in the world like the university system is. you hit the biggest one, that's the economy. we have to continue to take the steps -- >> does everything flow from the economy? >> absolutely. >> as a government -- >> talks about education, it is axiomat
to foreign policy and national security thing was his comment on the fact that we don't have to live with perpetual warfare for lives in decades. that could turn out to be one of the most important parts of the speech. we have national security and the defense budget, which i think is wildly out of control. it is a kind of old war budget for a very different era. and i hope that the president and the administration and republicans as well as democrats will take a good look at that. neil: did he miss an opportunity to do so? i know all about broad visions any spell out some of the details, but this was an opportunity to say that i see the magnitude of our debt. i see the magnitude of our problems. i am not oblivious to this. i want us all to join hands and look at ways to mutually get this down to size without dividing our social classes. i don't know if that opportunity was seized on appropriately enough today. >> well, i think it was a different kind of speech. but this is a president who has cut spending. he wants to cut more. i wish i could see that desire on a partisan basis, esp
're also entering into a new age of some beg decision in foreign policy because this country right now is starting to get some adversaries around the world because of our drone policy. that was not the situation four years ago. so this is -- our foreign policy is going to be judged on just how aggressive we get with that, and there's a growing concern in the community across the country about the drone attacks. just how many innocent people are we killing? there's been concerted conversation about we have to reel this in, and president obama, i think, is going to hear a great deal about that when it comes to foreign policy coming up here in the coming months. just how aggressive are we going to get? >> that specific reference that we should not be in a state of perpetual war. >> we are, and it's a different kind of war. >> i mean, that's the -- legally that's the justification that they cite for saying why it is that we can kill people in places where we're technically not waging some sort of war. that there is a global war still underway, and the authorization of using military force
at the president pulls a second term, this focusing on foreign policy and thand domestic issues. the president is facing a $16, $17 trillion debt. he is facing a pullout from afghanistan and our role in the world. guest: it is interesting. leadership, what does that mean. if you go back on the eve of the world war, the number of foreign military installations united compare that with, today. it was well under 100. the cold war has had an enormous transforming impact. dwight eisenhower cited all of this in his famous farewell address. i think there is a legitimate debate to be had over what is -- that is as old as the republic. washington post generation believed united states would be an asylum for the world also oppressed. -- world's oppressed. it was a place to which victims could come and enjoy the fruits of liberty. there was no sense that we were going to impose our vision or values on the rest of the world. host: this question, in case you missed earlier. why is the president having two swearing-in ceremonies? according to the inaugural committee, it has happened on six previous occasion
, the pivot eastward, if you will, when it comes to foreign policy. the pentagon is sounding the alarm over north korea's movement of some powerful missile launchers. what does this mean for stability in the renal as we look ahead? why some believe this may be a precursor to war. >>> also, the president as we just reported to you is officially sworn in for a second term in office. the big celebration is tomorrow. ahead, we'll look at inaugurations throughout our history. we'll be back with more happening now. ♪ [ slap! ] [ slap! slap! slap! slap! ] ow! ow! [ male announcer ] your favorite foods fighting you? fight back fast with tums. calcium-rich tums starts working so fast you'll forget you had heartburn. ♪ tum tum tum tum tums a. alright, another one just like that. right in the old bucket. good toss! see that's much better! that was good. you had your shoulder pointed, you kept your eyes on your target. let's do it again -- watch me. just like that one... [ male announcer ] the durability of the volkswagen passat. pa down something he will be grateful for. good arm. that's the power
another must be equal as well. >> reporter: foreign policy absent from his address, though he heralded the end of a decade of war, and touted the economy. >> the commitments we may teach each other, these things do not sap our nation, they strengthen us. >> reporter: the president mostly refrained from partisan jabs but appeared to single out his former gop opponent mitt romney with this line. >> they do not make us a nation of takers. ♪ >> reporter: filling the air with patriotism, the voices of kelly clarkson and beyonce. ♪ >> reporter: there was a poem and prayers. as he left the front of the capitol, a nostalgic president turned back toward the lincoln memorial. >> i want to take a look one more time. i'm not going to see this again. >> reporter: before the president gets back to work, he heads to the washington national cathedral for an interfaith service for prayers to be offered up for the country and the president. it's a tradition that dates back to fdr. soledad. >> dan lothian, thank you. for the night and parties at night, really party mode in the nation's capital, while
the country the stakes could not be higher. the debt, deficit, entitlement reform. immigration, foreign policy problems tend to be incredibly important in second terms as presidents realize, while they become lame ducks that advancing domestic agenda legislation is very difficult. we'll see the president likely travel more and deal with much of his international legacy. trying to wrap up his second term as best he can with so much unfinished foreign policy business he inhurted from bush administration. buckle up, jeff. not with standing the poet's kind words and the president's lofty rhetoric, washington tomorrow goes back into the being the political crawl city it has been in past years and likely to escalate more so. happy day, shep. shepard: happy day. at least we have today and men and women from both political parties, from the far right, far left and all of those in the middle, they're about to sit down for some individual tils. happy they are all are, dvittles. secretary lew and the rest for new cabinet sick tears all with fights ahead. we seen former presidents interacting with paul ry
and cody keenan. ben rhodes usually takes the foreign policy side of things. jon favreau, he's usually most involved in this big vision. >> >> jennifer: he's like 31 years old. >> cody keenan also young. he always plays a hand in this. my guess would be -- i haven't spoken to favreau about this. he would be working on this closely with president obama. they do the speeches up until the last minute. on the nobel prize acceptance speech, obama came down from his hotel room with a copy of the speech, went to the fourth floor and gave changes to make on the way over to receive the speech. that could be going on right now. >> john: these guys write the speeches in terms of overview. they're there for structure and tone but it is the president himself who decides what the final content is going to be and who makes the revisions he needs to. how deep his editorial involvement is. >> jennifer: if you're going to be true to who you are, as president, you have to -- you have to have input on this. the language has to come from you, naturally. he's a good writer. obviously he's got significant opinion
was in many ways provided the intellectual framework particularly for a lot of bush foreign policy. vice president biden used the senate and the relationships there and his practical skills has been invaluable in terms of promoting the agenda. >> now we have the marine band about to introduce the vice president of the united states. >> announcer: ladies and gentlemen, the vice president of the united states, joseph r. biden, accompanied by inaugural coordinator for the joint congressional committee on ceremonies, kelly fado. senate department sergeant at arms, martina bradford. house saght at arms carry handley. harry reed and nancy pelosi. >> i said that was the marine band. it was the u.s. army herald trumpets. >> have to get that right. >> what were you saying mark? joe, joe, joe? >> i think this concerns what we were talking about. >> our first glimpse of the president as he walks through the hall, accompanied as you can see behind by chuck schumer head of the joint committee and next to him, lamar alexander of the bipartisanship on display and behind him the leadership of the house
. then he becomes a lame duck and then you have to start shifting more and more toward foreign policy, traveling around the world. on the domestic agend ahe has a very short time before he becomes a lame duck. >> the president's inaugural address tomorrow is a tradition that dates back to george washington in 1789. the president plans to look ahead more than back in the speech. let's get some insight from the wall street journal columnist. what are your thoughts on what the president needs to say in order to be most effective, to best set himself up, going into the next four years? >> reporter: well, i don't know. we will find out what he and his aides have decided about that, just about 24 hours from now. i think a second inaugural address is always a little bit difficult, you know? a first inaugural, everybody's new and excited and it's like superman coming out of the telephone booth and showing you the big "s" on his chest. a second inaugural is like, hi, it's me again. so you want to -- you want to try to make it fresh and new anyway. and i think this president has a real opportun
of foreign policy, andy. good to have you here. good to see you. on the subject of foreign policy the president said the following in part: we are heirs to those who want peace and not just the war who turn sworn enemies into the surest of friends-- >> i've lost the audio. >> megyn: unfortunately we've lost the audio, you can hear anddy say. we'll try to get those reestablished and these are the dangers of live tv and these are the official vases. >> inaugural gifts. >> megyn: the one that was presented to the vice-president joe biden has a more springtime etching on the side of it and we'll take a brief listen and eric cantor and the president and first lady standing up. [applause] [applause] >> the toasts are coming up right after this. and this is in by the way, statuary hall. this used to be long, long ago, the hold house chamber, now it is the area in front of where the house of representatives is. there's a statue of nearly every state in statuary hall and the halls around that area, as we see the president and vice-president receiving those gifts. >> megyn: it wasn't the b
. in that it was almost entirely about foreign policy. we would go anywhere, bear any price, pay any price, bear any burden to ensure the survival of liberty. this time, the president's foreign policy really was disspilled into seven words, a decade of war is now ending, the contrast of the last half century is striking. >> and jonathan karl who covers the white house for us, jon, i know you're in the capitol steps, the president saying we can't succumb to the fiction that all society's ills can be cured through government alone yet the bulk of the speech really praised and support and encouragement for all the things we do together through our government. >> george, i felt during much of that speech like i was listening to a democratic ronald reagan where reagan was unapologetically conservative. this was unapologetically progressive saying we must act collectively. and this was also bound with optimism saying america's possibilities are limitless. this was an effort, i believe, at that kind of optimistic progressivism whereas a reagan was your optimistic conservatism. also, i was very struck by on
to the middle east and try to become a big foreign policy president. he's getting us out of wars in iraq and afghanistan and eisenhower got us out of korea. i think ike's in the air these days. it's a -- eisenhower revision going on. >> douglas brinkley, thanks so much for coming in. >> the connections to the past and past presidents is always so fun it look at and so amazing how there are so many similarities. when we get back, we'll have the latest news of the day, of course, plus a behind the scenes look what's happening at the white house this inauguration weekend. >> first we want to give you this week's look at the human factor. >> miss montana surrounded by more than 50 other beauty queens on stage. all hoping to become miss america. but for most of her early life, alexis weinman spent her time alone. >> i was very quiet because i couldn't say anything right. i was picked on for the way i spoke. i really didn't have any friends. >> her parents knew there was something wrong but their small town of cutbank, montana didn't have the resources to help them figure out what it was. at t
administration. second term. >> foreign policy is your expertise. three weeks ago we would not have thought of africa being a threat to americans. what concerns you about that situation? what can the president do about going forward? >> i think if we're talking about mali and places around mali, the president should support those who are going to lead the french. the french have a unique relationship and interest in mali. i think we should support them to the extent we can. they're one of our nato allies and they have been a friend of ours. but we have to keep our eye on the places. i don't think it will require american soldiers on the ground, but we have to realize that al qaeda has been badly diminished. let's not overlook the success we have had. but it doesn't mean it's gone away. and it doesn't mean that every al qaeda cell is getting ready to attack the united states of america. they're doing other things in the region as well. so be vigilant. help our friends. i don't think there's a need for a commitment of american troops. >> mr. secretary, thank you so much for being with us. as
fiscal cliff discussion, the economy is going to get zooming, we're going to -- foreign policy. >> it could end up being in foreign policy, drawing down troops, transitioning to this new kind of fighting force with the drone warfare, sort of in keeping with what we're alluding to eisenhower had. >> i think we're going to watch too very different but equally fascinating dramas play out. inside washington, the republicans still have the votes to stop the president on many things. they still control the house. they still have operational gridlock in the senate, if you will, even though democrats picked up. inside washington, the president has a challenge. but if you look at this, groundbreaking on gaye rights, back to climate change, gun control, immigration. and who that appeals to, as jack just said. they have made a doubling down of what they did in the campaign. they believe they have the coalition of the future -- young people, latinos, african-americans, and they believe the republican coalition is aging, in decline, and fractured. so they think politically they have the jui
off a foreign policy team to shape that as well that looks different. >> it does look different than the first term. it is about returning america home and defining what engagement looks like in a second term. he just got tax increases and he wants more revenue. if he can find a way to say i will cut sending in a big way and has the ability of splitting that republican coalition and he seems to be interested in doing. >> he was very close in the senate to the senator from oklahoma. if you spend 15 minutes with him as i did recently, he has ways to reduce spending on medicare that also improves service. the system is a mess. i think if i'm barack obama which obviously i'm not, but pafr ever we are in a bar and he's about to get inaugurated. >> would invite him to dinner about how to make medicare better and cheaper. >> here told us and tells a lot of people that's not who i am. i get a feeling the president is ready to get out of his comfort zone and reach out to democrats and republicans. >> there is this idea that the second term we have about a year and a half o
public policy, it is a foreign concept. that is exactly what martin did. he put love at the center of the public square. why have we abandoned that notion? >> the rule of money. everybody and everything is up for sale. you cannot have integrity, love, you cannot have trust if everything and everybody is up for sale. if you're leaders are up for sale, they will talk one way, get inside, and do something else. it is big money. for black people who have been hated for 400 years, hatred comingized a stric after us, and we dish out martin king, that love in the face of the hatred, that is a spiritual and moral high ground. the whole country has to take note of it with martin. the whole world has to take note of it. that is what is weak and feeble. it is not a question of speed -- skin pigmentation. it is a question of equality and morality of your speech rowdy. all of us fall short. [applause] >> now it is competition. the president takes no child left behind, which is the worst education law in my lifetime -- [applause] straight out of charles dickens. train them for exams, do not let
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)